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A Vulnerability Assessment of Fish and Invertebrates to Climate Change on the Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf
Atlantic salmon tops the list of species most vulnerable to climate change in Northeast
Located in News and Announcements / News
File The use of hatchery technology for the conservation of Pacific and Atlantic salmon
Abstract: Hatchery technology has been employed for the conservation of Pacific (Oncorhynchus spp.) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) for over 140 years. The initial societal paradigm was that nature is inefficient and hatcheries could be used to conserve stocks that were over utilized or suffering habitat degradation. Although these early hatcheries failed to meet their conservation objectives, they succeeded in developing the spawning-to-swimup fry culture technology used today. In the 1930s the paradigm shifted to artificial and natural production being equally effective and led to the closure of Federal hatcheries in areas with intact freshwater habitat. Hatcheries were maintained to mitigate for habitat loss from hydropower development. With the development of cost effective smolt production technology by 1960, the paradigm returned to nature being inefficient and ushered in the massive conservation utilization production of Pacific salmon that continues to this day. The early 1990s saw another paradigm shift with nature’s inefficiency recognized as being the foundation for evolution to maintain the fitness of salmon in their natural environment. This shift gave rise to a focus for hatchery technology to preserve stocks in their native habitats. Using hatcheries for preservation–conservation has become the norm for Atlantic salmon in the USA and Atlantic Canada and for Pacific salmon stocks listed under the Endangered Species Act in the USA or as species at risk in Canada.
Located in Groups / / Action Teams / Conservation Hatchery Action Team
Changing trophic structure and energy dynamics in the Northwest Atlantic: implications for Atlantic salmon feeding at West Greenland
NMFS publishes new Atlantic salmon diet study in Marine Ecology Progress
Located in News and Announcements / News
ICES Publishes NOAA Model to Predict Fish Population Response to Dams
NOAA Fisheries Scientists publish paper modeling the response of Atlantic salmon to dam removals on the Penobscot River, Maine, USA.
Located in News and Announcements / News
A recent paper in Science highlights the recent advancements in hi-tech tracking tags and coast wide collaboration used by partners in the Ocean Tracking Network. NOAA Fisheries scientist John Kocik is a co-author on the paper describing the collaboration of the network for tracking Atlantic salmon smolt and other species movements. http://www.nefsc.noaa.gov/press_release/pr2015/scispot/ss1507/
Located in News and Announcements / News