You are here: Home / News & Events / Calendar / Effects of Sea-level Rise and Extreme Events on Coastal Habitats and Their Wildlife

Effects of Sea-level Rise and Extreme Events on Coastal Habitats and Their Wildlife

This project takes a detailed bottom-up approach to assess vulnerability of Pacific coast habitats and their dependent wildlife at selected sites along a latitudinal gradient.
When Jan 10, 2013
from 04:25 PM to 04:25 PM
Add event to calendar vCal
iCal

SAFEGUARDING WILDLIFE FROM CLIMATE CHANGE WEB CONFERENCE SERIES (ALC3209)

A partnership between the National Wildlife Federation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Wednesday, January 16, 2013

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Wildlife Federation have developed a series of web conferences to increase communication and transfer of technical information between conservation professionals regarding the increasing challenges from climate change. This program is being facilitated by the USFWS's National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) Applied Landscape Conservation Team.

Downscaling Climate Change Models to Local Site Conditions: Effects of Sea-Level Rise and Extreme Events on Coastal Habitats and Their Wildlife

Wednesday, January 16, 1:00-2:30 PM Eastern

Dr. John Y. Takekawa

Research Wildlife Biologist,  USGS Western Ecological Research Center

Description: Coastal land managers are faced with many challenges and uncertainties in planning adaptive strategies for conserving coastal habitats at the land-sea interface under future climate change scenarios.  As transitional ecotones between the marine and terrestrial environment, intertidal to shallow subtidal habitats along the Pacific coast are particularly sensitive to change.  Projected climate change effects on coastal environments include sea-level rise, increased storm magnitude and frequency, salt water intrusion, accelerated erosion, shifting mud flat profiles, and increased water temperature and acidity.  The subtidal and intertidal zones of shallow bays, mud flats, and salt marshes are a linked continuum, and thus, understanding the complex relationships between them is critical to project the effect of climate change stressors. This project takes a detailed bottom-up approach to assess vulnerability of Pacific coast habitats and their dependent wildlife at selected sites along a latitudinal gradient. It examines the potential climate change effects on transitional coastal habitats with high-quality local habitat data, downscaled climate models, and projected storm effects, and links habitat responses to wildlife using vulnerability assessments.

YOU MUST REGISTER TO JOIN THIS WEBINAR

https://doilearn.webex.com/doilearn/k2/j.php?ED=145195727&UID=1156506537&HMAC=b7a4aa454e61133561bcef6e0e7aef2a679017f1&RT=MiMxMQ%3D%3D&FM=1 and register. Once submitted, your name will be added to the registry for the webinar and you will receive an email with instructions on how to join the webinar via WebEx platform.

THIS WEBINAR WILL BE RECORDED

If you cannot attend the webinar it will be posted approximately 1-2 weeks after the presentation is given and posted on our Climate Change website: http://training.fws.gov/CSP/Resources/climate_change/safeguarding_bc.html

CLOSE CAPTIONING WILL BE PROVIDED

Instructions will be given on the day of the webinar.

If you have any questions regarding this month’s webinar, please contact:

Dave_Lemarie@fws.gov and Tara_Edwards@fws.gov

More information about this event…

Document Actions